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turmeric root

© 2018 Steven Foster

A turmeric monograph for the home

Latin Name: Curcuma aromatica, Curcuma domestica, Curcuma longa


Common Names: turmeric, turmeric root, Indian saffron


This turmeric monograph provides basic information about turmeric—common names, usefulness and safety, and resources for more information.

Source: https://nccih.nih.gov/

Turmeric Basics

  • Turmeric, a plant related to ginger, is grown throughout India, other parts of Asia, and Central America. Javanese turmeric (Curcuma xanthorrhiz) is a different plant and not discussed in this fact sheet.
  • Historically, turmeric has been used in Ayurvedic medicine, primarily in South Asia, for many conditions, including breathing problems, rheumatism, serious pain, and fatigue.
  • Today, turmeric is used as a dietary supplement for inflammation; arthritis; stomach, skin, liver, and gallbladder problems; cancer; and other conditions.
  • Turmeric is a common spice and a major ingredient in curry powder. Its primary active ingredients, curcuminoids, are yellow and used to color foods and cosmetics.
  • Turmeric’s underground stems (rhizomes) are dried and made into capsules, tablets, teas, or extracts. Turmeric powder is also made into a paste for skin conditions.

Turmeric in Health Research

  • We have a lot of research, including studies done in people, on turmeric for a variety of health conditions.

Turmeric Research Summary

  • Claims that curcuminoids found in turmeric help to reduce inflammation aren’t supported by strong studies.
  • Preliminary studies found that curcuminoids may
    • Reduce the number of heart attacks bypass patients had after surgery
    • Control knee pain from osteoarthritis as well as ibuprofen did
    • Reduce the skin irritation that often occurs after radiation treatments for breast cancer.
  • Other preliminary studies in people have looked at curcumin, a type of curcuminoid, for different cancers, colitis, diabetes, surgical pain, and as an ingredient in mouthwash for reducing plaque.
  • The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) has studied curcumin for Alzheimer’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and prostate and colon cancer.

Cinnamon Safety

  • Turmeric supplements appear to be safe for most people for short-term use if not taken in large amounts. Some people may have allergic reactions to turmeric.
  • Turmeric should not be used in place of conventional medical care or to delay seeking care if you have health problems.

Turmeric References

 

PubMed Articles About


Source: National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI)[Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Library of Medicine (US), National Center for Biotechnology Information; [1988] – [cited 2018 Apr 5]. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/